Lots of questions about MHC care

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Lots of questions about MHC care

Post by Guest » Sun Jun 06, 2010 8:29 pm

I'm thinking about starting a small tank of MHCs once I get moved and settled into my new place. I have a 20L that I'd like to use, but I've never set up a saltwater tank before.
I'm wondering if my 20L will be big enough for a few MHCs? Not many, I'd like to get between 3-6. The ones I've seen have been very tiny, the size of micro LHCs, but I'm not sure what space requirements they have.
That leads me to my next questions, where can I find care sheets for them? I'd like to make sure I can get the set up right before I get any, and see what I'm getting myself into. Also, there are a ton of different species from what I've seen. What ones would be good for my tank?


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Post by Guest » Sun Jun 06, 2010 8:47 pm

My understanding is that they need a fully cycled marine tank. As in you would want to have more than just MHC's in it. My cousin has some and they are really great as a part of a marine tank, but it is a HUGE amount of work for him. Just the filters alone take up as much space as the tank.

I was looking into starting a saltwater aquarium before I got hermit crabs and ended up scrapping the idea and getting LHC's. I was recommended the "for dummies" series book about setting up a saltwater aquarium. I never got so far as to read it, but they have it at all the book stores near me and it might give you a little insight into the process.

Good luck! Marine tanks are really beautiful if you put the time into them.

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kgbenson
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Post by kgbenson » Mon Jun 07, 2010 6:47 am

Salt water tanks can be more challenging to set up than a standard fresh water (though there are some high tech fresh water tanks out there that are incredibly advanced - it all depends on what you want to do) but after that they are not too bad to maintain. I find my little 14 gallon reef tank is a joy and the red-legged marine hermits that I have in there are 5 years old (with me) and a lot of fun to watch.

Expense wise - it isn't cheap as far as aquaria go, but there are some good sources of information out there as well as some spectacular crabs and shrimp available.

Look at www.nano-reef.com and www.reefcentral.com to get started. Pay careful attention to what is needed and what is not. For instance: If the tank is small, don't bother with a protein skimmer - just be religious about water changes and save some money. Do invest in good lighting and quality live rock. Do get a refractometer and not the cheapy hygrometers that are fussy and inaccurate. Do get an autotop of unit to keep the salinity rock solid and give you piece of mind etc. Don't invest in a myriad supply of supplements - use a quality marine tank salt and change your water frequently. etc.

Keith

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OIF_VET
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Post by OIF_VET » Sat Jun 12, 2010 7:58 am

kgbenson wrote:Salt water tanks can be more challenging to set up than a standard fresh water (though there are some high tech fresh water tanks out there that are incredibly advanced - it all depends on what you want to do) but after that they are not too bad to maintain. I find my little 14 gallon reef tank is a joy and the red-legged marine hermits that I have in there are 5 years old (with me) and a lot of fun to watch.

Expense wise - it isn't cheap as far as aquaria go, but there are some good sources of information out there as well as some spectacular crabs and shrimp available.

Look at www.nano-reef.com and www.reefcentral.com to get started. Pay careful attention to what is needed and what is not. For instance: If the tank is small, don't bother with a protein skimmer - just be religious about water changes and save some money. Do invest in good lighting and quality live rock. Do get a refractometer and not the cheapy hygrometers that are fussy and inaccurate. Do get an autotop of unit to keep the salinity rock solid and give you piece of mind etc. Don't invest in a myriad supply of supplements - use a quality marine tank salt and change your water frequently. etc.

Keith
Excellent advice. I had a Nano and they are really decent. Everything you need for a small reef. The hood includes the lighting and fans.
Depending on size and whether you get the matching stand a Nano tank can cost from 200 to 600 dollars. You might find them a little less than that.
I am/was a member of Nano-reef.com Excellent source of info.


On a Side note. I am planning on setting up a 90 to 120 Gallon Reef tank.
I have a payment plan with my local Aquarium shop.
This whole setup (New) will cost about 2500 dollars.
They will keep an eye out for used equipment for me, and hopefully will reduce this cost.

Good luck and have fun setting up your MHC Tank :)
I do have a bit of experience in this area. Please ask questions!!!
The only stupid question is the one that is not asked! There are NO stupid questions!
Mike
OIF_VET :smileflag:
Welcome to the HCA! Advice for the Stressed, Owners and Crabs alike.
Been Crabby Since 8/16/05 Land, Marine Hermit Crabs Since Summer '04
Currently Have 4 PPs. I have Countless Successful Molts!
MY "Lil Dudes"

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